Sokoine University of Agriculture

Mopeia Virus– related Arenavirus in Natal Multimammate Mice, Morogoro, Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Günther, Stephan
dc.contributor.author Hoofd, Guy
dc.contributor.author Charrel, Remi
dc.contributor.author Röser, Christina
dc.contributor.author Becker-Ziaja, Beate
dc.contributor.author Lloyd, Graham
dc.contributor.author Sabuni, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Verhagen, Ron
dc.contributor.author Groen, Guido van der
dc.contributor.author Kennis, Jan
dc.contributor.author Katakweba, Abdul
dc.contributor.author Machang’u, Robert
dc.contributor.author Makundi, Rhodes
dc.contributor.author Leirs, Herwig
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-01T12:59:24Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-01T12:59:24Z
dc.date.issued 2009-12-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1044
dc.description Emerging infectious diseases, 2009; 15 (12) en_US
dc.description.abstract A renaviruses are segmented negative-strand RNA vi- ruses. Their natural hosts are various rodent species. The virus family comprises several human pathogens caus- ing hemorrhagic fever, namely Machupo, Guanarito, Junin, Sabia, and Chapare viruses in South America, and Lassa and Lujo viruses in Africa (1–3). In addition, Africa har- bors arenaviruses that are not linked with human disease: Mobala, Ippy, Mopeia, and Kodoko viruses (4–7). We con- ducted a systematic search in wildlife in Tanzania to iden- tify new African arenaviruses. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Mammalia en_US
dc.subject Arenavirus circulation en_US
dc.subject Molecular screening en_US
dc.subject Mopeia Virus en_US
dc.subject Natal Multimammate Mice en_US
dc.subject Morogoro en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.title Mopeia Virus– related Arenavirus in Natal Multimammate Mice, Morogoro, Tanzania en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.url www.cdc.gov/eid en_US


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