Sokoine University of Agriculture

Etiology and risk factors associated with iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women: a case study of Kilosa district, Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Ngandango, V. P.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-31T11:32:29Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-31T11:32:29Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.suanet.ac.tz:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/2951
dc.description Masters Thesis en_US
dc.description.abstract Iron deficiency anemia is still the leading cause of maternal mortality and poor pregnancy outcomes. This study aimed to determine etiology and risk factors associated with iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women in Kilosa district, Tanzania. Longitudinal study involved 368 pregnant women aged 15 to 49 years in the second trimester followed to term. Socio-demographic and biochemical data were collected. Anaemia status was determined based on Hb cut-off values as recommended by WHO. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16.0. Results showed that, majority (80.4%, n = 296) of respondents reported at antenatal clinics towards the end of the second trimester. Overall prevalence of anaemia was 31.9% (n = 124) implying moderate anemia. Majority (69.8%, n = 54) of the respondents who were in the third trimester were anaemic. Respondent aged below 25 years had low knowledge (50.9%, n = 87) and negative attitude (76.9%, n = 136) on eating iron rich foods. Average weight gains in the second and third trimesters were 2.79 ± 0.69 and 1.32 ± 0.33 kg respectively. Body fat gained ranged from 2.06 - 3.41%. This fat gained was considered bit high for pregnant women with normal body mass index. Body fat classification showed that (50.9%, n = 56) above 25 years were obese. Average birth weight of neonates was 2.9 ± 1.34 kg implying normal birth weights. Causes of iron deficiency anaemia included late reporting to antenatal clinics, low knowledge and negative attitudes on eating iron rich foods, monthly income below the poverty line. Poor maternal weight gains were some of the risk factors for increased low haemoglobin status. It was concluded that, there is a need for strengthening nutrition education at all level especially on anaemia control. The study, recommends, that all pregnant women must be screened for anaemia at each visits, and haemoglobin results discussed and given to the pregnant woman. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship One Health funded project en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Etiology en_US
dc.subject Risk factors en_US
dc.subject Iron deficiency anaemia en_US
dc.subject Anaemia en_US
dc.subject Pregnant women en_US
dc.subject Kilosa district en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.title Etiology and risk factors associated with iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women: a case study of Kilosa district, Tanzania en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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